An essay on phenomenological ontology sartre

Heidegger writes like someone who is a reader; Sartre like someone who is both a reader and a writer.

An essay on phenomenological ontology sartre

Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology. Translated with an introduction by Hazel E. Until now, the American image of Sartre has been based largely on his literary, rather than his philosophical, output.

It is a matter of some importance that his major philosophical work should now be available in English. Barnes, while sympathetic to Sartre, is no mere worshiper. What is the relation of the For-itself to the In-itself?

And how are both related to being? The body of the book is divided into four parts. Sartre concludes with a promise of a further volume devoted to the ethical implications of his conclusions in ontology, but this promise has not been kept in the intervening thirteen years.

Barnes has done a very competent translation. There are a few typographical errors, most of which can be corrected from the context; there are probably fewer errors in the English than in the French.

In addition to her translation and her introduction, she has drawn up a " Key to Special Terminology " pp. There is also an index of proper names. But the most efficient way to get an introductory understanding of Sartre, if that is still needed, would be to read his "Introduction" and "Conclusion" to Being and Nothingness.

Neither do I intend to attempt a Thomistic critique of Sartre, nor the construction of Thomistic answers to his problems. Instead, I shall list six lines of study which might profitably be applied to this book.

The first method of study might well be that of the logical analysts. It will be recalled that in G. Moore published a famous study of Idealism, the point of which was to determine what meaning, or meanings, if any, the sentence Esse est percipi may have.

His use of the words " being," " is," " distance," but above all " not," " nothing " and every form of the negative, is highly ambiguous.

My suspicion is that the terms " nothing " and " distance," at least, are devoid of meaning in Sartre; or are used so equivocally as to invalidate all of You are not currently authenticated.

View freely available titles:An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology, 2nd Edition.

An essay on phenomenological ontology sartre

By Jean-Paul Sartre. Routledge. pages.

Recommended For You

For Instructors Request Inspection Copy. Share. Jean-Paul Sartre (). The foremost French thinker and writer of the early post-war years. His books have exerted enormous influence in philosophy, literature, art and politics.

Being and Nothingness: An Essay on Phenomenologic al Ontology Sartre, Jean-Paul Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter - opens in a new window or tab Share on Pinterest - opens in a new window or tab.

The Letters of Jean-Paul Sartre to Simone de Beauvoir, –, ed.. Simone de Beauvoir, tr. and intro. Simone de Beauvoir, tr. and intro. Lee . Being and Nothingness: An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology (French: L'Être et le néant: Essai d'ontologie phénoménologique), sometimes subtitled A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology, is a book by the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, in which the author asserts the individual's existence as prior to the individual's essence ("existence.

The cover remains bright but has some light surface wear, rubbing to the edges, some taped corners, and light creasing. Being and Nothingness: An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology [Jean Paul Sartre, Hazel Barnes] on Amazon. Being and Nothingness: An Essay on Phenomenological Ontology (Routledge Classics) 2nd Edition by Jean-Paul Sartre (Author)/5().

Being and Nothingness - Wikipedia